Monday, June 17, 2019

Bellingham teen fired from working as a camp counselor with The Firs because he’s gay

Very informative article in Bellingham Herald.

Washington State has laws about discrimination against sexual minorities, but an exemption is made for religious organizations.

Here's more of my own commentary below.

There are a lot of accepting churches and organizations in this area. I wish Jace Taylor the best in finding an accepting place of employment and community. This exposes the brand of theology subscribed to by the Firs management. It's a different interpretation of Christianity than the way I was brought up. Kind of puts Bellingham on the map as it's making news on Seattle TV stations and so forth.

As for Washington State laws that exempt religious organizations, such as the Firs Camp near Bellingham, from the civil rights protection for sexual minorities, I am still okay with that. Being liberal, myself, also means I'm kind of into "live and let live," rather than necessarily forcing people to do things against their will. I am not a Libertarian anti government coercion sort of person, but I can see some of that point of view.

I would not wish to work for that kind of place anyway. I would seek more liberal religious or other types of organizations to work for and do business with.

Monday, June 10, 2019

Thinking about the degrowth movement. Saving the planet by working less. I'll add. and / or embracing better technology.

Here's an interesting article. The radical plan to save the planet by working less.

The degrowth movement makes lots of sense to me. First time I've seen the term degrowth, but I have been a fan of voluntary simplicity and shorter work week for many years. Quality of life and work / life balance is progress to me. There's more to progress than just increasing wealth and / or population.

That being said, I also am a fan of Technological progress. Technology might be able to help us squeeze more wealth out of the planet like converting to green energy, using efficient technologies like LEDs and possibly (dare I say this) nuclear power. Better yet, hydrogen fusion.

Still, the technology isn't solving everything. We do need to redefine wealth and learn to live in better ways. That's where shorter workweeks and more things like bicycling come into play.

I just realized a pun at the end of my post. "Shorter workweek and more things like bicycling come into play."

More time off. More time for play. Also adequate sleep and better relations with friends and family. Less rat race.

From comments on this post when I put it on Facebook.

I'm surprised that the word "greed" doesn't even appear in the article.
Maximus Gray.

I fully agree with this. What also goes along is the proverb phraise; you hate the job that you are stuck in traffic to, but you need the job to pay for the car that you are trapped in!
Mark Allyn.

Sunday, June 09, 2019

13,000 years ago, Seattle was under 10,000 ft of ice, but Seattle wasn't a city then. Human caused climate change could happen while the city is there.

Some people say, "why worry about climate change?" "The climate is changing anyway."

Over 13,000 years ago, Seattle was under 10,000 ft of ice. Of course, Seattle wasn't there back then. 13,000 years is much farther back than all of recorded history.

The global warming worry is about the next 100 years. Can we make it through the next 100 years? Our kids and grand kids. That's an important question for civilization. After that, who knows. Maybe we will be building huge colonies in the solar system by then; if civilization survives.

It's the next century that's the time scale for global warming worry, as far as civilization goes. As for other species of plants and animals, yes, they have come and gone. Many have gone extinct over the millions of years before we were here to care.

Saturday, June 08, 2019

Washington state health insurers propose lowest rate increase in Affordable Care Act era

Some good news here in the state of Washington. A very low rate increase; like just 1% for health plans on our Obamacare exchanges, According to an article in June 3 2019 Seattle Times. Seems like the system is stabilizing and starting to work well in this state. Work well at least for this year.

They are getting the bugs out, the system has arrived; like in "the Eagle has landed."

Washington is a state that created its own healthcare exchanges. Remember; states that refused Obamacare's Medicaid expansion often didn't set up their own exchanges so the Feds run the exchanges in those states. Our state seems to have managed it's exchanges well and at the local level. Ironically, accepting Obamacare may have meant more local control.

A public option is now in the works, here in Washington as well. Roll out for the public option is planned for 2021.

If Eastern Washington State were to secede, why not be more original? Name the new state Columbia.

From Komo News, January 2019.

Two Republican state lawmakers from Spokane Valley have submitted a bill to create a 51st state - again.

House Bill 1509, sponsored by Rep. Matt Shea and Rep. Bob McCaslin, would split Washington state in half along the Cascades, separating Eastern Washington from Western Washington.

The counties on the west side of the Cascades would remain in the state of Washington, while the counties on the east side would comprise an entirely new state named Liberty.

From my Facebook.

Seems like whenever there is a movement to split a geographic entity, the break off region goes for a name like "Liberty." Years ago, there was a move to split two regions off of Whatcom County. There was "Freedom" and also "Independence" Counties. Can't people be more original? Seems like every break off idea goes for the a name like Independence.

If Eastern Washington were to create the 51st state, why not call it something related to local geography? How about the state of "Columbia?" Yes, the Columbia River is a very important feature right through the heart of Eastern Washington. Much of that economy is dependent on the river.

I tend to think breaking the state in two is a bad idea.

Here's some more of my thinking.

Where would the new state capital be? Spokane? That's an economic hub for both eastern Washington and Northern Idaho. Spokane calls itself the hub of the Inland Empire. It's like, "all roads lead to Spokane." Problem is, there's another Inland Empire. That Inland Empire is focused around east Los Angeles Metro area and San Bernardino.

Splitting regions can be problematic for sure; especially for a place like the town I grew up in; Pullman, WA. Pullman is home of a big University, Washington State University. Much of the money and students at WSU come from the populous and prosperous west side of the state.

Trivia question:

The last county to be created in Washington State. Created by a split is Pend Oreille County. It's up in the north east corner.

Thursday, June 06, 2019

Here's my answer to the question, "do you caption all the photos in your collection?"

A photographer friend of mine put out the question on Facebook, do you caption all your photos? He does, but he finds that the task can be tedious.

Here's my answer.

I love captioning my photos on Facebook and Flickr. I find that a lot of people don't caption photos on Flickr, at least. Descriptions provide food for search engines bringing more searches to one's photo.

I also find descriptions are a means of self expression. I like to write in my blog, but not that many people read my blog. Breaking up my writing into various photo descriptions on Flickr, rather than writing to this blog. My photos on Flickr seems to bring a lot more readers.

Like Facebook, Flickr allows fairly long descriptions. There's the title / caption and then more space for a description below.

I have not been captioning photos that I don't post. That would be tedious. Some of these are close to being duplicates. Others are ones I don't think are worth posting, tho I often do change my mind given another look at the photo.

My photos are kept in folders on my computer under the label of the year the photo was taken.

The photos in my computer are not captioned, but I remember the circumstances for most of them. Also, a lot of those photos are taken around the time of the ones that I do post and label. They are usually photos from similar contexts.

Tuesday, June 04, 2019

One of many reasons for Facebook

Like Facebook or not, here's the kind of thing that keeps Facebook so pervasive as a tool for self expression. One of the NPR shows that I follow, The1A from WAMU Radio, has just shut down the comments section on it's website. It says there is too much abuse and too many bots. They don't have enough resources to moderate the comments section. The notice also says one can continue to comment on their - Facebook page. Also on their Twitter presence. This is because it's easier to verify who's making the comments using the existing Facebook system, rather than managing their own comments section.

Not that I used the comments section that much, but I did use it some. When using it, logged in with another system that I like. It's an alternative to Facebook, but a bit different. A system called Disqus. Disqus is a social media that manages one's comments to other media. I'm afraid Disqus may no longer work for The1A site, at least for now.

My feed on Disqus where I've signed in while to use the comments section in some other medias, such as radio stations and publications. You can get an idea how Disqus works.

One problem with big media outlets, which has been the case for decades. Information overload. This is a big country, now 320 million people. On national media, one's comments are usually lost among thousands of comments, since the internet age when comment pages became available. Before the internet age, one could write letters to the editor, like to the New York Times, but there was only room for a handful of letters given the volume of mail they got. Local media did better being on a smaller scale. The Bellingham Herald used to pride itself in being able to publish almost every letter to the editor it got.

One thing Facebook has done is create a system that breaks up the size of audiences to facilitate more discussion; like breaking a lecture class into group discussions. Except for celebrities, one's personal friends are usually one's most likely audience. Facebook builds from that as often the larger audiences start among friends and then spreads from there. I do think other systems, like Disqus also have merit.

Sunday, June 02, 2019

If one can thunder on over 100 radio stations coast to coast, one might not need Facebook

There are quite a few people who don't use Facebook. One person, I know, is a college professor who enjoys teaching as an outlet for his creativity. One could say he doesn't really need Facebook. Also he's skeptical of it's corporate nature.

I still see Facebook as a common person's outlet for writing and photography.

This makes me think of a segment of a radio talk show I remember from the mid 1990s. Someone called the show suggesting the host get a website. Websites were new, back then.

The host was skeptical. He kept saying, "why would I need a website?"

The caller persisted talking about how he could post articles, archives and so forth.

The host eventually started thundering like the Wizard of Oz. He said, "My voice is heard on over 100 radio stations coast to coast." "It blankets America just fine, thank you." "I don't need no web what?"

Forward to now, I just looked up that host. I don't think he's got a show anymore, but his rants are available on a website.

In that discussion I had with the professor, the problem of junk mail came up. He admits that email is almost unusable now due to so much clutter of junk mail. I find the same problem with telephones. It's why I don't answer the phone unless people leave a message. One good thing about Facebook, it filters out a lot of the bulk stuff so it tends to be the more interesting responses from real people. Not flooded with a bunch of appeals for money from various organizations. Real people are more apt to value my thinking, rather than just my checkbook.

I do admit that Facebook would probably be better if run by a nonprofit.