Tuesday, April 16, 2019

Wealth isn't all bad; especially now that Bernie Sanders is part of the 1%

Bernie Sanders is now part of the 1%.

Reminded by the Times reporter that he is now someone of considerable means, Sanders retorted: "I wrote a best-selling book. If you write a best-selling book, you can be a millionaire, too." Apparently, Hillary Clinton made a similar comment and got flack for it.

I remember when being a millionaire was a big deal. These days, you pretty much have to be a millionaire to be middle class if you live in a place like Seattle or the San Francisco Bay Area. At least you are a millionaire if you own a home and your mortgage is paid off.

This reminds me of the controversy over Al Gore's big house from a few years back. An environmentalist living in a big house? Well, maybe a former vice president still needs space to house the Secret Service.

Big time celebrities and politicians are the ones with name recognition that people flock to. Seems like that's all but inevitable in a big country such as ours. I think if I ran for president, it wouldn't get much farther than my Facebook friends.

Getting electioned takes name recognition. I've often thought that one house of Congress ought to be selected by random lottery, rather than popularity contest. By random lot, maybe some obscure janitor would be represented. There would be representation from pretty much all walks of life. Experts as well as nitwits in many fields.

Lots of very wealthy people are on our side culturally. Many support higher taxes on their own wealth. The left does need it's powerful and influential people as well. Much of it depends on how the money is used and what policies are being promoted.

At the same time it can often be said that we have met the enemy and he is us. Our society tends to create and then follow the people of wealth. Hollywood celebrities are often listened to more than scientists, for instance. Whether we like it or not, we tend to uphold fame and fortune.

I constantly like to remind people, "we have met the enemy and he is us." I saw that phrase on a banner in the hallway of my high school many years ago. It's been with me most of my life.

I think it's useful to try not to think in terms of who's the enemy. Another quote I like is from Mahatma Gandhi. "Be the change you want to see in this world."